Ilocano literature - Wikipedia

 

ilokano literature

Feb 02,  · THE GUMIL - GUNGLO DAGITI MANNURAT NGA ILOKANO • GUMIL Filipinas' main objectives are: – To provide a forum in which Ilokano writers can undertake common and cooperative efforts to improve their craft of writing literary, historical, research and other works; – To enrich Ilokano literature and cultural heritage as phases of the national. The terms "Iloko" and "Ilokano" are different. Generally, "Iloko" is the language while "Ilokano" refers to the people or the ethnicity of the people who speak the Iloko language. Ilokano literature in the Philippines is one of several regional literatures that include Tagalog, Cebuano, Hiligaynon, Bikol, and Pangasinense literatures. The UH Ilokano Program is the only degree-granting program in the world. Other Philippine universities, however, offer Ilokano as part of a coursework for a degree in other fields such as in literature, education, language studies, language teaching, and linguistics, comparative literature, and English studies.


Ilokano literature : Wikis (The Full Wiki)


The word Ilokano originates ilokano literature Iloko archaic form, ilokano literature, Ylocothe conjugation of i- meaning "of" and look meaning "bay"which means "from the bay" in Ilocano.

Aside from being referred to as Ilocano, ilokano literature, they are also identified as Samtoy, a portmanteau of the Ilokano literature phrase sao mi ditoy meaning "our language here" sao mi - "our language"; ditoy - "here". Ilocandia is the term given to the traditional homeland of the Ilocano people, which constitutes present-day Ilocos Norte and the northern portions of Ilocos Sur. Due to ethnic migration programs of the government in the 's, many Ilocanos now live outside their traditional homeland.

Known areas with significant Ilocano populations outside the traditional homelands are the Cordillera Administrative RegionCagayan Valleyilokano literature, the southern parts of the Ilocos region, and some parts of Central Luzon. Ilocanos number about 9, Most Ilocanos speak Ilocanowhich is part of the Northern Philippine subgroup of the Austronesian family of languages.

They also speak Tagalogand English ilokano literature second languages. Most Ilocanos are Roman Catholicswhile a significant number [ quantify ] belong to the Aglipayan Churchilokano literature, which originated in Ilocos Norte.

Prior to the arrival of the Spanish, Ilocanos were animists who believed in spirits called anito who were either bad or good, male or female. These anito ruled over all aspects of the universe.

The Mangmangkik were often feared for ilokano literature sickness when a fellow tree was cut down. To appease the Mangmangkik before cutting down a tree, the following chant was made:, ilokano literature. This chant calls on the Mangmangkik and beseeches them not to curse the people cutting the tree down. Other ways anitos were respected and appeased were through offerings and sacrifices to idols on platforms called a simbaan or designated caves where the anito frequents.

These offerings, called 'atang', consisted of various foodstuffs and sweets, as well as cigars and paan. Atang is also offered to the deceased during prayers for the dead or on All Soul's Day. The number of fingers raised would be the indicator of how many people would have to be killed in order to accompany the dying to the afterlife. In Ilocano mythology, Angalo was a mythical creation giant who was also the first man.

The Banaoang Gap, in Santa, Ilocos Sur was said to be created by Angalo when he kicked the mountain range while sleeping. Many Filipino Americans are of Ilocano descent. From — BC [9] a migration of Austronesian speaking people from the island of Borneo arrived on the shores of northwest Luzon.

They were the most recent of the three waves of migration to the Philippines known as the Malay. Before the arrival of these people, the inhabitants of northwest Luzon were a different Austronesian speaking people called the proto-Malay group whom consist of the modern TinguianIsnegKalingaKankanaeyBontoc and other tribes collectively known today as the Igorot.

Prior to the arrival of the Igorot were the people known today as the Aeta or Negritos, ilokano literature. Over time, the Malay people intermarried with the proto-Malay and or Aeta people, and it is their descendants who lived along the coasts of Northwestern Luzon that the Spanish first came in contact with and called Ilocanos.

Their wealth was maintained by their control of trade with primarily the Chinese, Japanese, Igorots, and the Tagalogs. They largely practised wet-rice agriculture which included rice and taro as well as dry agriculture that included cotton. Both Ilocano men and ilokano literature grew their hair long, but tied it up in different ways. Some women twisted their hair to create a bun, while some men twisted their hair and hid it under a turban like wrapping called a bangal or potong.

The patterns and colors ilokano literature the bangal had many meanings. For example, red potong indicated that the wearer had killed, while a striped pattern indicated that the wearer killed at least seven people. The Spanish conquistador Juan de Salcedo explored the northern regions of the Philippines inwhere he traveled to the Ilocos region among other placesilokano literature, pacifying the North, and establishing several Spanish municipalities, including Villa Fernandina known as Vigan City in the present time and Tagudin.

InAndres Malong, a chief of San Carlos, Pangasinan or Binalatongan as it was called than, allied with the people of Zambales in an effort to throw out the Spanish and plunder those who opposed them. Malong was once employed by the Spanish to help pacify and conquer ilokano literature towns and villages in Pangasinan, ilokano literature, however, as Malong conquered others, he realized he could also overcome the outnumbered Spanish.

With his Zambales allies, Malong crowned himself the king of Pangasinan and sent out letters to all the chiefs ilokano literature the Ilocos RegionPampanga and Cagayan Valley and demanded that they too align and recognize Malong as their king and kill any Spaniards among them. If they did not, Malong warned ilokano literature he would invade and punish them for not joining his cause.

Unlike Pangasinan and the ZambalesThe Ilocos at the time was a region that the Spanish invested its soldiers and missionaries in and routinely secured, ilokano literature. Towns such as Vigan, Ilocos Sur and Tagudin, Ilocos Sur were quickly conquered with Spanish encomiendasilokano literature, fortifications and Catholic churches quickly established to subdue the Ilocano people into the Spanish Empire.

Ilokano literature Spanish were swift in this process to stake their claim on the region's gold trade with the Igorots. Considering ilokano literature relatively recent history with the Spanish and primarily under the influence of Catholic missionaries, many of the Ilocano chiefs rejected Andres Malong's offer.

In response to their ilokano literature, Malong sent a Zambales chief named Don Pedro Gumapos, who had recently conquered the Pampanga region with 6, men, to invade the Ilocos as well as Cagayan regions.

Gumapos and his men were met with only 1, loyalist Ilocanos under the command of the Spanish alcalde mayor of the region and even missionaries.

Ilokano literature such, the Zambales and Pangasinese army quickly defeated them and marched as far north as Ilokano literature, Ilocos Sur where they pillaged and burned the Spanish stronghold and nearby villages, ilokano literature. With many of the Spanish missionaries and authorities in the Ilocos evacuated and in retreat, Malong than asked Gumapos to assist him in Pangasinan, where the Spanish were beginning to advance on him.

As Gumapos and his troops traveled back down through Narvacan, Ilocos Surthey continued to raid Ilocano towns and villages for supplies and spoils, ilokano literature.

Ultimately, the people of Narvacan responded in guerrilla tactics aided by their Tinguian allies. Despite learning of Malong's defeat, Ilokano literature led his army to battle. Gumapos and his army were defeated after two large battles, ilokano literature. After being captured, ilokano literature, Gumapos was sent back to Vigan, Ilocos Sur where ilokano literature was executed by hanging. The mounting population pressure due to the substantial population density during the midth century caused the migration of the Ilocanos out of their historic homeland.

More thanmoved to PangasinanTarlacand Nueva Ecija, ilokano literature. Almost 50, ilokano literature, moved to Cagayan Valley; half of them resided in Isabela. Around 47, lived in Zambales and the Sultan Kudarat more than 11, The Ilocano diaspora continued in when Ilocanos started to migrate to Hawaii and California. Ilocanos composed the largest number of expatriates in the United Statesthough most are bilingual with Tagalog. Ilocanos boast of a somewhat healthy diet heavy in boiled or steamed vegetables and freshwater fish, but are particularly fond of dishes flavored with [1] bagoongfermented fish that is often used instead of salt.

Ilocanos often season boiled vegetables with bagoong monamon fermented anchovy paste to produce pinakbet. Local specialties include the "abuos," soft white larvae of ants, and "jumping salad" or tiny, live ilokano literature with kalamansi juice.

Another food that is popular for many Ilocanos is the Moringa or "Marunggay". It is a good condiment for meat soup called La'uya e. Most households grow this tree in their backyards and ilokano literature offered free for all the neighbors who may want them. Many Ilocanos from Hawai'i are fond of eating them. The Ilocano people are also known to be the first ethnic group in the Philippines to eat the larvae and eggs of abuos weaver ants.

The practice has since been infused as well with other ethnic groups in northern Luzon. One of the most well-known Ilocano literary works written in Iloco is the Biag ni Lam-ang The Life of Lam-Angan epic ilokano literature about the fantastic life and escapades of an Ilocano hero named Lam-ang.

The Ilocano writer Elizabeth Medina is probably the most remarkable living Ilocano writer in the Ilokano literature language. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The Gale Group, Inc.

Retrieved December 10, Retrieved History of Ilocos. Mateo, Grace Estela University of Hawaii. Yabes, Leopoldo Tarong an Ilocos Barrio in the Philippines. The Philippine Islands, — Cleveland, ilokano literature, Ohio: The Arthur H. Clark Comopany. Newson, Linda Conquest and Pestilence in the Early Spanish Philippines. Cortes, Rosario Pangasinan Alejandre [ macalejandre] 7 July Very native. Alejandre though is portuguese italian.

I wonder hw we got it" Tweet — via Twitter. Ilokano literature I don't. I wish I ilokano literature though!!! I'm cheating. I have a translator. My friend here in cebu teaches me. Heehee" Tweet — via Twitter. Ilokano literature American" Tweet — via Twitter. Ni mamang ken papang ko, ilokano literature. Hahaha" Tweet — via Twitter. Although i'm an Ilocano" Tweet — via Ilokano literature. Taga batangas kasi tatay ko e.

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Ilokano Language and Literature Program | University of Hawaii at Manoa

 

ilokano literature

 

The terms "Iloko" and "Ilokano" are different. Generally, "Iloko" is the language while "Ilokano" refers to the people or the ethnicity of the people who speak the Iloko language. Ilokano literature in the Philippines is one of several regional literatures that include Tagalog, Cebuano, Hiligaynon, Bikol, and Pangasinense literatures. Feb 02,  · THE GUMIL - GUNGLO DAGITI MANNURAT NGA ILOKANO • GUMIL Filipinas' main objectives are: – To provide a forum in which Ilokano writers can undertake common and cooperative efforts to improve their craft of writing literary, historical, research and other works; – To enrich Ilokano literature and cultural heritage as phases of the national. Literature. One of the most well-known Ilocano literary works written in Iloco is the Biag ni Lam-ang (The Life of Lam-Ang), an epic poem about the fantastic life and escapades of an Ilocano hero named Lam-ang. "Biag ni Lam-ang" is a testament in the Ilocano literature.