(DOC) Lab Report-Fermentation | Dan Dunn - seisiyns.gq

 

alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report

Also studied 3 factors that affect enzyme activity and the fermentation process by yeast. Write a report to explain your conclusion. Further information, see “Fermentation. Yeast fermentation lab report The gas bubbles produced by fermenting yeast also make bread rise. In this lab, students will explore the process of alcoholic fermentation by. Alcoholic fermentation uses enzymes to convert glucose into ATP (which the cell can use to do work) in the absence of oxygen. Alcohol and carbon dioxide are also produced in this reaction. In the experiment you performed in lab, you measured the amount of CO 2 produced in alcoholic fermentation under different conditions. Fermentation Formal Lab Report. Download. The purpose of this group’s research was to see the effects of yeast fermentation with glucose, sucrose, fructose and lactose. The structures of each of the sugars suggests that the test tube containing glucose would ferment the most because it would require less work to break down into pyruvate.


Fermentation lab report - The Writing Center.


To browse Academia. Skip to main content. You're using an out-of-date version of Internet Explorer. Log In Sign Up. Fermentation Formal Lab Report. Stephanie Magaly. Cellular respiration and alcohol fermentation are examples of this characteristic, alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report. Yeast, a single celled organism conducts fermentation when sugar is present, alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report, to make chemical energy, and in the process produce alcohol and carbon dioxide.

Experiments were performed to understand this process better. One experiment focused on yeast and glucose, while another observed how yeast fermented and produced CO2 with different types of sugars.

Respirometers were used to record the amount of CO2 production. Both experiments proved to be informative, with all expected sugars fermenting the yeast and producing carbon dioxide.

However, the exact predictions made were not fully supported by the results and when comparing to the results of a different group, alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report, questions are brought to the surface on the performance the experiments. Were there errors? Should the experiment be administered again with minor changes to protocol? Introduction Cellular respiration is a process that most living organisms undergo to create and obtain chemical energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate ATP.

The energy is synthesized in three separate stages of cellular respiration: glycolysis, citric acid cycle, and the electron transport chain. Glycolysis and the citric acid cycle are both anaerobic pathways because they do not need oxygen to form energy. The electron transport chain however, is aerobic due to its use of oxidative phosphorylation.

Oxidative phosphorylation is the process in which ATP molecules are produced with the assistance of oxygen molecules. Campbell et al Fermentation is a process adopted, typically, by anaerobic organisms to obtain ATP without the use of oxygen.

Organisms that have alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report ability are called facultative anaerobes. When yeast is in the presence of oxygen it performs cellular respiration, but when oxygen is absent it undergoes alcohol fermentation. In alcohol fermentation, the sugar is converted into two 3-Carbon sugars known as pyruvate.

The pyruvate alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report then converted into ethanol alcohol in two steps. Next the acetaldehyde is reduced to ethanol. Campbell et al The experiments performed in Dr. Two experiments were performed a week apart. The first experiment, experiment A, studied the fermentation exclusively between yeast and glucose. A respirometer was used to observe the amount of CO2 produced during fermentation.

Based on previous knowledge of fermentation activity, it can be concluded that a test tube containing a greater volume of yeast, rather than glucose, would have the most CO2 production, because fermentation of glucose is dependent on yeast.

The second experiment, experiment B, was designed by the students, with alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report lab group making their own design. The structures of each of the sugars suggests that the test tube containing glucose would ferment the most because it would require less work to break down into pyruvate and acetaldehyde Fig.

The yeast, because of its lack of appropriate enzymes, would not ferment lactose. Figure 2 Molecular structure of lactose.

Experiment A. The resipormeters used in the experiment consisted of a 1 mL serological pipette, aquarium tubing, binder clip, and a test tube. First, the aquarium tubing was attached to the pipette, which was then placed in a beaker filled half way with water.

A pipette pump alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report attached to the tubing and then drew water from the beaker, up to the 0 mL mark. With the pipette pump still attached, the tubing was bent and the clip placed at the bend, as a way to prevent the liquid from falling back into the tube.

Next the test tubes for the experiment were prepared. The test tubes were labeled 1, 2, 3, and 4. Necessary amounts of water and glucose were added to all test tubes Table 1. The yeast was added last to avoid reaction occurring sooner than needed. As soon as the five minutes had passed, the respirometers were added to each test tube and made ready for obtaining data. Immediately after they were added, the timer started.

The liquid level was recorded every two minutes for 20 minutes. Table 1. Test tube set-up for experiment A. The second experiment was executed similar to part A, with minor changes, and a week later. All test tubes were labeled and then filled with necessary liquids, with yeast being added last Table 2. After five minutes had passed the newly made respirometers were added to the test tubes and the timer started at 0 minutes.

For the next 20 minutes the level of liquid in the pipette was recorded every two minutes. Table 2. Figure 3 shows the amount of CO2 produced over a 20 minute time period. Test tubes containing either only yeast, or only glucose, produced almost no CO2, if any at all. Test tubes 3 and 4, which contained both yeast and glucose, produced a significant amount of CO2 Table 1. The test tube containing more yeast than glucose, produced the most CO2 and in a faster amount of time than the tube containing a larger amount of glucose over the yeast.

Experiment B. Figure 4 demonstrates the amount of CO2 produced when yeast fermented with various sugars Table 2. CO2 was produced in all tubes ranging from 0. In the time period of the experiment, the test tube containing sucrose had reached the maximum amount of production before the minute mark, while the test tube containing glucose had reached the maximum at the very end of the experiment.

Fructose had produced more CO2 than expected, alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report, while lactose produced a negligible amount of CO2 as predicted. Discussion The purpose of these experiments was to better understand fermentation by yeast. Both experiments worked with yeast and a sugar.

The first experiment had two controls, tubes 1 and 2 Table 1which each contained either yeast or glucose. The remaining tubes both contained yeast and glucose. Tube 4 had more yeast than glucose while tube 3 had more glucose than yeast.

We had predicted that the test tube containing more yeast would produce a higher volume of CO2. Figure 2 supports our prediction. Tube 4 had produced the most CO2, while tubes 1 and 2 showed almost no production.

This was because there was much less yeast to ferment the amount of glucose present. In experiment B, we used various sugars to ferment the yeast Table 2. Upon examining the structures we determined that glucose would show more production of CO2 than the other sugars, because of its structure and the results obtained from experiment A. We felt that it may take more energy to break down the sugar. We also considered the fact that a 6-Carbon sugar attached to a 5-Carbon sugar would limit production of CO2.

Fructose, a 5-Carbon sugar, was not taken into much consideration in the amount of carbon dioxide production; however we did believe that some CO2 would evolve from the combination. We predicted that lactose would produce almost no carbon dioxide. The disaccharide was complex and we assumed there were no enzymes alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report the yeast to break down galactose.

Our results both refuted and supported our predictions. While glucose did produce the maximum amount of CO2, sucrose also produced the same and in a shorter amount of time Fig.

The results showed that sucrose produced more CO2 and at a faster rate than glucose. Fructose, as we predicted, produced a small amount of CO2 and lactose produced almost no CO2. It is possible that yeast has enough enzymes to break down the sucrose, allowing for rapid fermentation of the sugar. When looking at the results from Alhasan et alwho tested all the same sugars as us, their glucose mixture produced the maximum amount of CO2 in the minute time frame while fructose produced approximately 0.

These results contradict ours completely. Assuming that they had executed their experiment perfectly, the only conclusion that can be made about the varying results is that when the respirometers were being read for liquid levels, they were pulled out completely from the sugar-yeast mixture.

However, this was consistent throughout both experiments. There are other possible experiments that can be conducted to determine what sugar best ferments with yeast.

The experiment can be repeated again, twice with the respirometers remaining in the mixtures when liquid levels are being read and once more with them being pulled out. It is also possible and would be interesting to work with compressed yeast. Compressed yeast, often used for baking breads, is a dry solid form of yeast packed into blocks.

Would placing simple syrup sugar dissolved in watercause an immediate reaction? Are other things, such as flour, necessary for a reaction to occur? Nuss for reviewing and providing comments on the draft. Also to Alhasan alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report al, alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report. References Campbell, N.

Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago Illinois. Related Papers.

 

Experiment 1b: Alcoholic Fermentation in Yeast by Tyler Houston on Prezi

 

alcoholic fermentation in yeast lab report

 

Looking at what our hypothesis was, we were fairly confused as to why our data showed that sucrose fermented faster than glucose. We decided to research the subject and what we found was interesting. Most studies show that glucose (a monosaccharide) should ferment faster since it. Alcoholic fermentation uses enzymes to convert glucose into ATP (which the cell can use to do work) in the absence of oxygen. Alcohol and carbon dioxide are also produced in this reaction. In the experiment you performed in lab, you measured the amount of CO 2 produced in alcoholic fermentation under different conditions. Yeast Fermentation Rates Dependent on the Food Sources and How. Primary Alcohol Fermentation. Of fermentation and is characterized by a decrease of LAB [2], [3]. Yeast Fermentation Lab. View Lab Report - seisiyns.gq from BIOLOGY at Community College of Baltimore County.